List of presidents of Bolivia

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This article contains a list of presidents of Bolivia, from the Declaration of Independence after the conclusion of the War of Independence (1825) to the present day.

Background[edit]

The origins of Bolivia are trackables to Chuquisaca Revolution of 1809 in Upper Peru,[1] followed by La Paz revolution within the same year, which was part of the Latin American wars of independence against Spanish colonial governments. Despite other struggles for independence, the insurgents immediately formed a constitutional government who rejected any oath or compromise with Spain. The rebel government also integrated all parts of population, including mestizos and indigenous. However, by the early 1810, the rebels were defeated, with their leaders executed or hunted down, leaving the neighboring countries of Peru and Argentina to fight for the controls of the Upper Peru areas.[2]

In early 1825, General Antonio José de Sucre led his army to Upper Peru after his triumph in the Battle of Ayacucho on 9 December 1824, which ended the Spanish rule over Peru, entering La Paz on 9 February 1825. After his arrival, he issued a decree considered the milestone of Bolivian independence, calling a "General Assembly of Deputies of Upper Peru" in the town of Oruro (then moved to Chuquisaca, present-day Sucre) to clarify the political status of the province.[3] On 6 August 1825, the representatives voted for three alternatives: annexation to Peru, annexation to Argentina or full independence and establishment of a republican state.[4] The large majority of deputies opted for independence, and Upper Peru was declared a country in the same day. The General Simón Bolívar was deeply popular in the region, and was immediately elected by the General Assembly as President. To honor who was considered one of the great libertadores, the delegates chose to name Upper Peru as "Republic of Bolívar", changing it into Bolivia in 3 October 1825, echoing the delegate Manuel Martín Cruz who stated "If to Romulus, Rome; to Bolívar, Bolivia" (Si de Rómulo, Roma; de Bolívar, Bolivia).[5]

List[edit]

President
(Birth–Death)
Term Party Form of entry
Form of exit
Vice President
SIMÓN BOLÍVAR PALACIOS.jpg Simón Bolívar
(1783–1830)
6 August 1825

29 December 1825
Independent Elected by the General Assembly.
Resigned from office.
Office blank
1825–1828
Martin Tovar y Tovar 12.JPG Antonio José de Sucre
(1785–1830)
29 December 1825

18 April 1828
Independent Elected by the Constituent Congress.
Resigned from office.
From 18 April to 2 August 1828, the presidency was fullfilled by José María Pérez de Urdininea.
From 2 August to 18 December 1828, the presidency was fullfilled by José Miguel de Velasco Franco.
Pedro Blanco Soto.jpg Pedro Blanco Soto
(1795–1829)
18 December 1828

1 January 1829
Independent Elected by the Constituent Congress.
Assassinated in office.
José Ramón de Loayza
From 1 January to 24 May 1829, the presidency was fullfilled by José Miguel de Velasco.
Andréssantacruz2.jpg Andrés de Santa Cruz
(1792–1865)
24 May 1829

17 February 1839
Independent Elected by the Constituent Congress.
Protector of the Peru–Bolivian Confederation (1836–39)
Resigned from office and fled out Bolivia.
José Miguel de Velasco
(Before 1835)
Mariano Enrique Calvo
(Since 1835)
José Miguel de Velasco Franco - bolivianischer Präsident.jpg José Miguel de Velasco
(1795–1859)
22 February 1839

10 June 1841
Military Installed by a coup d'état.
Elected by the Constituent Congress.
Resigned from office.
Office blank
1839–1880
Sebastián Ágreda - bolivianischer Präsident.jpg Sebastián Ágreda
(1795–1875)
10 June 1841

9 July 1841
Military Installed by a coup d'état.
Elected by the Constituent Congress.
Resigned from office.
Mariano Calvo.jpg Mariano Calvo
(1782–1842)
9 July 1841

22 September 1841
Independent Nominee by Sebastián Ágreda.
Deposed by a coup d'état.
José Ballivián.jpg José Ballivián
(1805–1852)
27 September 1841

23 December 1847
Military Installed by a coup d'état (1841).
Elected by the Constituent Congress (1843).
Resigned from office.
Eusebio Guilarte Vera - bolivianischer Präsident.jpg Eusebio Guilarte
(1805–1849)
23 December 1847

2 January 1848
Military Succeeded to office according Constitutional laws.
Deposed by a coup d'état.
José Miguel de Velasco Franco - bolivianischer Präsident.jpg José Miguel de Velasco
(1795–1859)
18 January 1848

6 December 1848
Military Installed by a coup d'état.
Deposed by a coup d'état.
ManuelIsidoroBelzu.jpg Manuel Isidoro Belzu
(1808–1865)
6 December 1848

15 August 1855
Military Installed by a coup d'état.
Resigned from office.
Jorge-cordova.jpg Jorge Córdova
(1822–1861)
15 August 1855

9 September 1857
Military Elected by popular vote (1855).
De facto governing with military's assistance.
Declared deposed by Linaristas (9 September).
Defeated by insurgents and fled (27 September).
José María Linares.jpg José María Linares
(1808–1861)
9 September 1857

14 January 1861
Constitutional Elected by the National Congress (Linaristas).
Deposed by a coup d'état.
From 14 January to 4 May 1861, the presidency was fullfilled by a transitory triumvirate.
JoseMariaAcha.jpg José María de Achá
(1810–1868)
4 May 1861

28 January 1864
Military Installed by a coup d'état (1861).
Elected by popular vote (1862).
De facto governing with military's assistance.
Deposed by a coup d'état.
MarianoMelgarejo.jpg Mariano Melgarejo
(1820–1871)
28 January 1864

15 January 1871
Military Installed by a coup d'état.
Deposed by a coup d'état.
AGUST N MORALES HERN NDEZ.jpg Agustín Morales
(1808–1872)
15 January 1871

27 November 1872
Military Installed by a coup d'état.
Assassinated in office.
TOMÁS FRÍAS AMETLLER.jpg Tomás Frías Ametller
(1804–1884)
27 November 1872

9 May 1873
Constitutional Succeeded to office according Constitutional laws.
End of the term.
ADOLFO BALLIVI N COLL.jpg Adolfo Ballivián
(1831–1874)
9 May 1873

31 January 1874
Constitutional Elected by popular vote (1873).
Died in office.
TOMÁS FRÍAS AMETLLER.jpg Tomás Frías Ametller
(1804–1884)
31 January 1874

4 May 1876
Constitutional Succeeded to office according Constitutional laws.
Deposed by a coup d'état.
HILARIÓN DAZA GROSELLE.jpg Hilarión Daza
(1840–1894)
4 May 1876

28 December 1879
Military Installed by a coup d'état.
Declared deposed during his absence (War of the Pacific)
From 28 December 1879 to 19 January 1880, the presidency was fullfilled by the presidential cabinet.
NARCISO CAMPERO LEYES.jpg Narciso Campero
(1813–1896)
19 January 1880

4 September 1884
Liberal Elected by the National Congress.
End of the term.
Aniceto Arce
(First Vice President)
Belisario Salinas
(Second Vice President)
GREGORIO PACHECO LEYES.jpg Gregorio Pacheco
(1823–1899)
4 September 1884

15 August 1888
Democratic Elected by popular vote (1884).
End of the term.
Mariano Baptista
(First Vice President)
Jorge Oblitas
(Second Vice President)
Aniceto Arce.jpg Aniceto Arce
(1824–1906)
15 August 1888

11 August 1892
Conservative Elected by popular vote (1888).
End of the term.
José Manuel del Carpio
(First Vice President)
Serapio Reyes Ortiz
(Second Vice President)
Mariano Baptista Caserta.jpg Mariano Baptista
(1832–1907)
11 August 1892

19 August 1896
Conservative Elected by popular vote (1892).
End of the term.
Severo Fernández
(First Vice President)
Vacant
(Second Vice President)
SEVERO FERNÁNDEZ ALONSO CABALLERO.jpg Severo Fernández
(1849–1925)
19 August 1896

12 April 1899
Conservative Elected by popular vote (1896).
Deposed by a civil war.
Rafael Peña de Flores
(First Vice President)
Jenaro Sanjinés
(Second Vice President)
From 12 April to 25 October 1899, the presidency was fullfilled by a transitory triumvirate.
Jose manuel pando 2.jpg José Manuel Pando
(1849–1917)
25 October 1899

14 August 1904
Liberal Installed after a civil war
Elected by the National Congress.
End of the term.
Lucio Pérez Velasco
(First Vice President)
Aníbal Capriles
(Second Vice President)
Ismael montes 2.jpg Ismael Montes
(1861–1933)
14 August 1904

12 August 1909
Liberal Elected by popular vote (1904).
End of the term.
Eliodoro Villazón
(First Vice President)
Valentín Abecia
(Second Vice President)
Eliodoro Villazón con banda presidencial.jpg Eliodoro Villazón
(1848–1939)
12 August 1909

14 August 1913
Liberal Elected by popular vote (1909).
End of the term.
Macario Pinilla
(First Vice President)
Juan Misael Saracho
(Second Vice President)
Ismael montes 2.jpg Ismael Montes
(1861–1933)
14 August 1913

15 August 1917
Liberal Elected by popular vote (1913).
End of the term.
Juan Misael Saracho
(First Vice President)
José Carrasco Torrico
(Second Vice President)
Jose Gutierrez Guerra.jpg José Gutiérrez Guerra
(1869–1929)
15 August 1917

12 July 1920
Liberal Elected by popular vote (1917).
Deposed by a coup d'état.
Ismael Vázquez Virreira
(First Vice President)
José Santos Quinteros
(Second Vice President)
From 13 July 1920 to 28 January 1921, the presidency was fullfilled by a transitory triumvirate.
Bautista Saavedra Mallea 2.jpg Bautista Saavedra
(1870–1939)
28 January 1921

3 September 1925
PRS Installed by a coup d'état (1920).
Elected by the National Congress (1921).
Resigned from office.
Vacant
From 3 September 1925 to 10 January 1926, the presidency was fullfilled by the Senate President Felipe S. Guzmán.
Hernando siles reyes.jpg Hernando Siles
(1882–1942)
10 January 1926

28 May 1930
PRS
(Before 1927)
Elected by popular vote (December 1925).
Resigned from office.
Abdón Saavedra
PN
(After 1927)
From 28 May 1930 to 5 March 1931, the presidency was fullfilled by the presidential cabinet (before 28 June 1930), then by General Carlos Blanco Galindo.
Daniel Salamanca Urey.jpg Daniel Salamanca
(1869–1935)
5 March 1931

1 December 1934
PRG Elected by popular vote (1931).
Resigned under military's threat.
José Luis Tejada
Jose luis tejada sorzano.jpg José Luis Tejada
(1882–1938)
1 December 1934

16 May 1936
PRG Succeeded to office according Constitutional laws.
Deposed by a coup d'état.
Vacant
From 16 to 22 May 1936, the presidency was fullfilled by Major Germán Busch.
DAVID TORO RUILOVA.jpg David Toro
(1898–1977)
22 May 1936

13 July 1937
Military Installed by a coup d'état.
Forced to resign from office.
Vacant
Presidente german busch.jpg Germán Busch
(1904–1939)
13 July 1937

23 August 1939
Military Succeeded to lead the military junta.
Died in office.
Vacant
(Before 1938)
Enrique Baldivieso
(Since 1938)
CARLOS QUINTANILLA QUIROGA.jpg Carlos Quintanilla
(1888–1964)
23 August 1939

15 April 1940
Military Succeeded to lead the military junta.
Resigned from office.
Vacant
Enrique Peñaranda.jpg Enrique Peñaranda
(1892–1969)
15 April 1940

20 December 1943
Military Elected by popular vote (1940).
De facto governing with military's assistance.
Deposed by a coup d'état.
Vacant
Gualberto Villarroel López.jpg Gualberto Villarroel
(1908–1946)
20 December 1943

21 July 1946
Military Installed by a coup d'état.
Assassinated in office.
Julián Montellano
From 21 July to 17 August 1946, the presidency was fullfilled by Attorney General Néstor Guillén.
From 17 August 1946 to 10 March 1947, the presidency was fullfilled by Supreme Court's Justice Tomás Monje.
Enr herz.jpg Enrique Hertzog
(1897–1981)
10 March 1947

24 October 1949
PURS Elected by popular vote (1947).
Resigned from office.
Mamerto Urriolagoitía
Mamer-urriol.jpg Mamerto Urriolagoitía
(1895–1974)
24 October 1949

16 May 1952
PURS Succeeded to office according Constitutional laws.
End of the term.
Vacant
Hugo Ballivian Rojas.jpg Hugo Ballivián
(1901–1993)
16 May 1951

11 April 1952
Military Installed by Urriolagoitía's self-coup.
Deposed by a popular sedition.
Vacant
Víctor Paz Estenssoro con banda presidencial.jpg Víctor Paz Estenssoro
(1907–2001)
15 April 1952

6 August 1956
MNR Elected by popular vote (1951).
Installed by popular sedition (1952).
End of the term.
Hernán Siles
Hernán Siles Zuazo con banda presidencial.jpg Hernán Siles
(1914–1996)
6 August 1956

6 August 1960
MNR Elected by popular vote (1956).
End of the term.
Ñuflo Chávez Ortiz
Víctor Paz Estenssoro con banda presidencial.jpg Víctor Paz Estenssoro
(1907–2001)
6 August 1960

4 November 1964
MNR Elected by popular vote (1960).
Successfully re-elected (1964).
Deposed by a coup d'état
Juan Lechín Oquendo
(Before 1964)
René Barrientos
(Since 1964)
René Barrientos
(1919–1969)
5 November 1964

27 April 1969
MPC Installed by a coup d'état (1964).
Elected by popular vote (1966).
Died in office.
Alfredo Ovando Candía
(Before 1966)
Luis Adolfo Siles
(Since 1966)
Siles Salinas.jpg Luis Adolfo Siles
(1925–2005)
27 April 1969

26 September 1969
PSD Succeeded to office according to Constitutional laws.
Deposed by a coup d'état.
Vacant
Alfredo Ovando Candía.jpg Alfredo Ovando Candía
(1918–1982)
26 September 1969

6 October 1970
Military Installed by a coup d'état.
Ousted from office by another coup attempt.
Vacant
From 6 to 7 October 1970, the presidency was fullfilled by a military triumvirate.
Juan José Torres 1971.jpg Juan José Torres
(1920–1976)
7 October 1970

21 August 1971
Military Installed by a counter-coup.
Deposed by another coup d'état.
Vacant
From 21 to 22 August 1971, the presidency was fullfilled by a military triumvirate.
Hugo Banzer Suarez, General, Presidente da Bolívia..tif Hugo Banzer
(1926–2002)
22 August 1971

21 July 1978
Military Installed by a coup d'état.
Resigned due to large political dissent.
Vacant
On 21 July 1978, the presidency was fullfilled by the Chairman of the Military Junta Víctor González Fuentes.
Juan Pereda Asbún.jpg Juan Pereda
(1931–2012)
21 July 1978

24 November 1978
Military Elected by popular vote (1978).
De facto governing with military's assistance.
Deposed by a coup d'état.
Vacant
David Padilla
(1927–2016)
24 November 1978

8 August 1979
Military Installed by a coup d'état.
Dismissed after his successor's election.
Vacant
Wálter Guevara
(1912–1996)
8 August 1979

1 November 1979
PRA Elected by the National Congress (1979)
Deposed by a coup d'état.
Vacant
Alberto Natusch Bush.jpg Alberto Natusch
(1933–1994)
1 November 1979

16 November 1979
Military Installed by a coup d'état.
Forced to resign under National Congress's pressure.
Vacant
From 16 November 1979 to 17 July 1980, the presidency was fullfilled by the Chamber President Lidia Gueiler Tejada.
From 17 to 18 July 1980, the presidency was fullfilled by a military triumvirate.
Luis García Meza
(1929–2018)
18 July 1980

4 August 1981
Military Installed by a coup d'état.
Deposed by another coup d'état.
Vacant
From 4 August to 4 September 1981, the presidency was fullfilled by a military triumvirate.
Celso Torrelio Villa.jpg Celso Torrelio
(1933–1999)
4 September 1981

19 July 1982
Military Selected by the military junta.
Dismissed by military authorities.
Vacant
From 19 to 21 July 1982, the presidency was fullfilled by a military triumvirate.
Guido Vildoso.jpg Guido Vildoso
(1937–)
21 July 1982

10 October 1982
Military Selected by the military junta.
Dismissed after completing the transition to democracy.
Vacant
Hernán Siles Zuazo con banda presidencial.jpg Hernán Siles
(1925–2005)
10 October 1982

6 August 1985
MNRI Elected by popular vote (1980).
Confirmed by the National Congress (1982)
End of the term.
Jaime Paz Zamora
Víctor Paz Estenssoro con banda presidencial.jpg Víctor Paz Estenssoro
(1907–2001)
6 August 1985

6 August 1989
MNR Elected by popular vote (1985).
End of the term.
Julio Garrett Ayllón
Jaime Paz Zamora.jpg Jaime Paz Zamora
(1939–)
6 August 1989

6 August 1993
MIR Elected by popular vote (1989).
End of the term.
Luis Ossio
Gonzálo Sánchez de Lozada-Agencia BrasilAntonio Cruz.jpg Gonzalo Sánchez de Lozada
(1930–)
6 August 1993

6 August 1997
MNR Elected by popular vote (1993).
End of the term.
Víctor Hugo Cárdenas
Hugo Banzer Suarez, General, Presidente da Bolívia..tif Hugo Banzer
(1926–2002)
6 August 1997

7 August 2001
ADN Elected by popular vote (1997).
Resigned from office.
Jorge Quiroga
Jorge Quiroga-1.jpg Jorge Quiroga
(1960–)
7 August 2001

6 August 2002
ADN Succeeded to office according to Constitutional laws.
End of the term.
Vacant
Gonzálo Sánchez de Lozada-Agencia BrasilAntonio Cruz.jpg Gonzalo Sánchez de Lozada
(1930–)
6 August 2002

17 October 2003
MNR Elected by popular vote (2002).
Resigned from office.
Carlos Mesa
Carlos Mesa, ex-President of Bolivia (croppeda).jpg Carlos Mesa
(1953–)
17 October 2003

9 March 2005
MNR Succeeded to office according to Constitutional laws.
Resigned from office.
Vacant
R veltze presidente.jpg Eduardo Rodríguez
(1956–)
9 March 2005

22 January 2006
Independent Succeeded to office according Constitutional laws.
End of the term.
Vacant
Presidentes del Perú y Bolivia inauguran Encuentro Presidencial y III Gabinete Binacional Perú-Bolivia (36962597345) (cropped).jpg Evo Morales
(1959–)
22 January 2006

10 November 2019
MAS Elected by popular vote (2005).
Successfully re-elected (2009, 2014).
Resigned from office.
Álvaro García Linera
From 10 to 12 November 2019, the office of President was vacant.
Jeanine Áñez 2016.png Jeanine Áñez
(1967–)[6][7]
12 November 2019

Incumbent
MDS Succeeded to office according to Constitutional laws.[8]
Interim President
Vacant

Timeline[edit]

Jeanine ÁñezEvo MoralesEduardo RodríguezCarlos MesaJorge QuirogaGonzalo Sánchez de LozadaJaime Paz ZamoraGuido VildosoÁngel Mariscal GómezNatalio Morales MosqueraÓscar Jaime PammoCelso TorrelioRamiro Terrazas RodríguezWaldo Bernal PereiraLuis García Meza TejadaLidiaGueiler TejadaAlberto NatuschWálter GuevaraDavid PadillaJuan PeredaVictor González FuentesJaime Florentino Mendieta VargasHugo BanzerAndrés Selich ChopJuan José TorresAlberto Albarracín CrespoFernando Sattori RiberaEfraín Guachalla IbáñezLuis Adolfo Siles SalinasAlfredo Ovando CandíaRené BarrientosVíctor Paz EstenssoroHernán Siles ZuazoHugo BalliviánMamerto UrriolagoitíaEnrique HertzogTomás MonjeNéstor GuillénGualberto VillarroelEnrique PeñarandaCarlos QuintanillaGermán BuschJosé Luis Tejada SorzanoDaniel Salamanca UreyCarlos Blanco GalindoEzequiel Romecín CalderónCarlos BanzerFidel VegaJosé Aguirre AcháDavid ToroFranklin MercadoGermán Antelo ArauzAlberto Díez de MedinaHernando Siles ReyesFelipe S. GuzmánJosé Manuel RamirezJosé Maria EscalierBautista SaavedraJosé Gutiérrez GuerraEliodoro VillazónIsmael MontesMacario Pinilla VargasSerapio Reyes OrtizJosé Manuel PandoSevero FérnandezMariano BaptistaAniceto ArceGregorioP achecoNarciso CamperoPedro José Domingo de GuerraHilarión DazaAdolfo BalliviánTomás Frias AmetllerAgustín MoralesMariano MelgarejoManuel António SanchezJosé Maria AcháRuperto FernándezJosé Maria LinaresJorge CórdovaManuel Isidoro BelzuEusebio Guilarte VeraJosé BalliviánMariano CalvoSebastián ÁgredaAndrés de Santa CruzPedro Blanco SotoJosé Miguel de Velasco FrancoJosé María Pérez de UrdinineaAntonio José de SucreSimón Bolivar

Living former presidents[edit]

As of 27 March 2020, there are seven living former presidents:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Notimérica, ed. (May 5, 2017). "La Revolución de Chuquisaca, 207 años del Primer Grito Libertario de América" (in Spanish).
  2. ^ Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes (ed.). "Doctrina del libertador/Simón Bolívar; prólogo Augusto Mijares; compilación, notas y cronología Manuel Pérez Vila" (in Spanish). Retrieved August 2, 2019.
  3. ^ Urgentebo, ed. (August 9, 2016). "La independencia de Bolivia y el Decreto de 9 de febrero de 1825" (in Spanish).
  4. ^ Quispe, Jorge (August 6, 2012). La Razón (ed.). "El 'país viable' que convenció a Bolívar" (in Spanish).
  5. ^ Notimérica, ed. (September 4, 2018). "¿Por qué Bolivia se llama Bolivia?" (in Spanish).
  6. ^ "La senadora Jeanine Áñez asumió la presidencia provisional de Bolivia tras la renuncia de Evo Morales" (in Spanish). Infobae. Retrieved 2019-11-12.
  7. ^ "El MAS reconoce la sucesión por renuncia y abandono de funciones de Evo y Álvaro". Pagina Siete. November 20, 2019. Retrieved November 20, 2019.
  8. ^ https://tcpbolivia.bo/tcp/?q=content/comunicado-1